Building RabbitMQ Cluster

Cluster with RabbitMQ

As I promised last time, it’s time to check out RabbitMQ feature we can consider advanced – clustering. RabbitMQ cluster is a set of individual nodes that share the same users, queues, exchanges and runtime parameters. New nodes can come and go, be located at different continents, yet for the connected client they will look like one entity.

Clustering is not the same as replication or high availability. Yes, users and whatever is usually necessary for node to work will be copied across all nodes. Queues, however, will reside on the node they were initially created, though they will be accessible from any node. If one node goes down, its queues go with him.

Continue reading “Building RabbitMQ Cluster”

Quick intro to RabbitMQ

Quick intro to RabbitMQ

RabbitMQ is an example of full blown Message Queue that somehow remained simple to use. Unlike ZeroMQ, which is embeddable into the services that use it, RabbitMQ is a broker. It’s an intermediary messaging service with own users, permissions, encryption, configurable durability and delivery acknowledgements, clustering, high availability, and bazillion of other features you might never need. RabbitMQ is built on top of Erlang and inherits its known resilience with compatibility to virtually any OS.

In the following article we’ll try to get a sense of how messaging with RabbitMQ feels like. I’ve chosen Ubuntu (in a Docker container) as a platform, but it could’ve been anything else. Continue reading “Quick intro to RabbitMQ”